Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Surviving The Exam Season For Teens: Part Two

Revision is not always the most exciting time of year but it can be the most rewarding when you sit down at your exam desk and those hours spent consolidating your knowledge are now deeply embedded in your brain for easy access.



When you are going through the revision process it can sometimes feel as if your brain is crammed and fit to burst. Generally, experts who have analysed revision techniques have found that little and often is best and taking regular breaks is much more effective to allow those layers of learning to settle.

When you do schedule your revision, try to add some breathing breaks.
Alternate Nostril Breathing is a great way to create a sense of calm balance within your body and mind enabling you to improve concentration levels and focus.

How To Practise Alternate Nostril Breathing

Sit comfortably with your legs crossed and raise your right hand to make the Vishnu Mudra by folding down the index and middle fingers. If this is difficult just place your palms together and your thumbs at the tip of your nose. Close the right nostril with the right thumb and exhale completely through the left nostril. Inhale completely through the left nostril, keeping the right nostril closed with the right thumb. Release the right nostril and exhale completely. Inhale fully through the right nostril and then release the left nostril and exhale completely. This is one round. Aim for 10 rounds and then rest your hands on your lap taking a few gentle breaths in and out using both nostrils. Rub your palms together to create some heat in your hands and gently place them over your eyes as you gradually open your eyelids and return to your studies refreshed.

The science bit

A 2011 study of engineering students demonstrated how alternate nostril breathing boosted academic performance by improving feelings of well-being, memory and stress relief.

Find out more about the research here

1 comment:

  1. To expand on these ideas your imagination works for your studio. Don't be afraid to try new things. But do some calculations first and figure out how many kids you need enrolled to make it profitable. If it doesn't reach this level, you simply cancel the Yoga Class. Many studios have found kids programs to be very popular and profitable.

    ReplyDelete

Our Mala

Last autumn my yoga teaching was transformed when I attended Strala Yoga intensive in London with Tara Stiles and I had the 'aha'...